Basic Sciences-Clinical Sixth Trimester

Course
Lecture
Hours
Lab
Hours
Credit
Hours
Bioethics General and Legal
2
 
2
Introduction to Surgical Sciences
3
 
4
Problem-Base-Integration and Medical Correlation
2
 
3
Thanatology
1
 
1
Health in the 21st Century
2
 
2
Alternative Medicine
3
 
3
CPR
1
 
1
NMBR (National Medical Board Review) USMLE
 
6
2
TOTAL: Hours, Credits
14
6
18

 

Bioethics General and Legal

Developments in biology and medicine have been and continue to be an important source of progress for human health and quality of life. However, these developments raise also concerns with regard to the protection of human dignity and fundamental rights and freedom. Thus, in the field of bioethics, the objective of the course is to give guidelines to protect the individual’s dignity and fundamental rights with regard to the applications of biology and medicine. While science and technologies evolve constantly, they also require permanent rethinking of the issues they raise as well as reaction to those issues. A group of experts comprised of scientists, medical doctors, lawyers and philosophers will make this class very attractive.

 

Introduction to Surgical Sciences

Basic science knowledge is a fundamental element of surgical practice. The emphasis during the course is the introduction to basic surgical skills around pre- per- and post operative care. The principles of surgical management cases, where you are encouraged to follow individual pathways and make your own decisions about the patient’s diagnosis and treatment is part of the curriculum. This early introduction will provide the student with a solid foundation to the Art of Surgery that the student will experience in the clinical rotations.

 

Problem-Base-Integration and Medical Correlation

This section will make possible the integration between basic sciences and the clinical aspect of practicing medicine.

Integrative cases are an innovative educational experience for first and second year students in the MD Program at the International School of Medical Sciences.

They are learner-driven activities in which students examine an issue or case from many perspectives, including basic science, clinical, public health, social/ethical issues and health care systems.

Through active, experience-based assignments and faculty-led small group discussions, students discover many factors influencing health and wellbeing and explore themes in medicine that will recur in their training and medical careers.

Our goals are:

  • Make connections across basic science, medicine and public health
  • Provide experiences and introduce themes that offer a more expansive view of medicine and the community
  • Stimulate interest and questions that anticipate future learning
  • Develop skills in lifelong knowledge, problem solving, independent and team learning
  • Develop practical skills in communicating findings and research

 

Thanatology

The Introduction to Thanatology -the study of death among human beings- investigates the circumstances surrounding a person's death, the grief experienced by his loved ones, and the social attitudes towards death. It also describes bodily changes that accompany death and the after-death period. It is an interdisciplinary study, frequently undertaken by different professionals. We have decided to include this class that will enable the student to broaden his/her knowledge with a most humane aspect of medicine, which is often forgotten due to the rapid progress of the profession.

 

Health in the 21st Century

New directions for health into the 21st century have been released in order to save millions of lives and have a major impact on global wellbeing and poverty reduction within a decade. The main aim of organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) is to increase health life expectancy for all - while ensuring a better deal for the world's poorest people.

Recent studies suggest that as many as one in two long-term smokers die from their habit. If current trends continue, by 2030 tobacco could kill 10 million people a year, over 70% of them in developing countries, where information on tobacco-related disease is often weakest. There are many other examples but the two main challenges confronting health systems in all countries are:  how to ensure efficiency, and how to achieve - and maintain - universal coverage.

 

Alternative Medicine

Referred to a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not generally considered to be part of conventional medicine.

While scientific evidence exists regarding some Alternatives therapies, for most there are key questions that are yet to be answered through well-designed scientific studies—questions such as whether these therapies are safe and whether they work for the purposes for which they are inteded. This introduction will give the student a broad introductory knowledge into the field.

 

CPR

We use the AHA guidelines to train all students in CPR.

In sudden cardiac arrest the heart goes from a normal heartbeat to a quivering rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF). This happens in approximately 2/3rds of all cardiac arrests. VF is fatal unless an electric shock, called defibrillation, can be given.

  • CPR does not stop VF but CPR extends the window of time in which defibrillation can be effective.
  • Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in adults. Most arrests occur in persons with underlying heart disease.
  • CPR doubles a person's chance of survival from sudden cardiac arrest.
  • 75% of all cardiac arrests happen in people's homes.
  • The typical victim of cardiac arrest is a man in his early 60's and a woman in her late 60's
  • Cardiac arrest occurs twice as frequently in men compared to women.
  • CPR was invented in 1960
  • There has never been a case of HIV transmitted by mouth-to-mouth CPR.

CPR provides a trickle of oxygenated blood to the brain and heart and keeps these organs alive until defibrillation can shock the heart into a normal rhythm.

If CPR is started within 4 minutes of collapse and defibrillation provided within 10 minutes a person has a 40% chance of survival.

 

 

NMBR (National Medical Board Review)

These are comprehensive lectures designed to help students review the semester curriculum in order to start preparation for their medical board exams in the United States, Canada, and other countries.