Basic Sciences - Third Trimester

Course
Lecture
Hours
Lab
Hours
Credit
Hours
General Human Pathology
5
6
7
Neurology Sciences
5
0
5
Physical Diagnosis,Symptoms and Signs of Illness
2
 
2
Introduction to Family Practice
2
 
2
Problem-Base-Integration and Medical Correlation
2
 
2
Female Comprehensive Exam
2
 
2
NMBR (National Medical Board Review) USMLE
0
 
2
TOTAL: Hours, Credits
18
6
22

Course Descriptions

General Human Pathology

The course will teach the mechanisms of human disease and the morphological characteristics of the pathophysiological processes that cause the clinical signs and symptoms of disease by discussing general pathologic processes such as cell injury, inflammation and repair, and neoplasia. 

 

Neurology Sciences

This class will introduce the student to the vast field of Neurology, exploring the mysteries of the brain and the body's intricate network of nerves.

The brain is the most complex organ in the body. It is the centre of what makes us human. Disorders of the brain are just as complex, and can affect our ability to speak, move, think, and even to simply interact. Consider life with a stroke causing paralysis or a malignant brain tumor. Few diseases evoke the emotions of fear and helplessness, the loss of dignity and independence, and the impact on one’s family as much as diseases of the brain and nervous system. Learning new minimally invasive techniques to locate and destroy brain tumors. Meeting the challenges of Parkinson's disease through experimental gene and stem cell therapies and investigational drugs. Developing surgical advances that offer new hope for people with previously untreatable epilepsy. 

Physical Diagnosis, symptoms and signs of illness

This class is dedicated to the development of the necessary skills in physical diagnosis techniques and their application to patient care.  Through demonstration students will learn how to conduct a proper and complete physical examinnation, a step by step learning of symptoms and signs of illness, as well as attending rounds that include teaching of proper bedside manner.

 

Introduction to Family Practice

With all the aspects of making the human touch of medicine part of every family that we heal, the practice of Family Medicine, make these conferences and practice very enjoyable.

This course of Family Practice is dedicated to the education of physicians, who will be effective providers of patient-centered care in the context of family and community. Providing the practitioner with leadership in the academic and community-based research and education that addresses the needs of communities.  In today's needed expansion of the health system, ISMS considers Family Practice one of the most important specialties.

 

Problem-Base-Integration and Medical Correlation

This section will make possible the integration between basic sciences and the clinical aspects of practicing medicine.

Integrative cases are an innovative educational experience for first and second year students in the MD Program at the International School of Medical Sciences.

They are learner-driven activities in which students examine an issue or case from many perspectives, including basic science, clinical, public health, social/ethical issues and health care systems.

Through active, experience-based assignments and faculty-led small group discussions, students discover many factors influencing health and wellbeing and explore themes in medicine that will recur in their training and medical careers.

Our goals are:

  • Make connections across basic science, medicine and public health
  • Provide experiences and introduce themes that offer a more expansive view of medicine and the community
  • Stimulate interest and questions that anticipate future learning
  • Develop skills in lifelong knowledge, problem solving, independent and team learning
  • Develop practical skills in communicating findings and research

 

Female Comprehensive Examen

The first contact a physician has with a patient is critical. It allows an initial bond of trust to be developed on which the future relationship is built. The patient will share sensitive information, feelings, and fears. The physician will gain her confidence and establish rapport by the understanding and nonjudgmental manner in which he or she collects this data.

This contact generally involves taking a complete history, performing a complete physical examination, and ordering appropriate initial laboratory tests. In such a way the physician gains impressions of the patient's problems and needs and plans accordingly.  A gynecologic history adds important information to complete a general history. In like manner the physical examination should be complete, no corners should be cut.

This chapter focuses on the appropriate manner that a gynecologist should use to conduct a history and physical examination. An accurate, legible, and complete medical record is an important component of the patient's care.

 

NMBR (National Medical Board Review)

These are comprehensive lectures designed to help students review the semester's curriculum in order to start preparation for their medical board exams in the United States, Canada, and other countries.